Migrant children are often their parents’ translators

Migrant children are often their parents’ translators – and it can lead to ill health

An estimated 30% of Australians are born overseas while nearly 20% speak a language other than English at home. But our translation services grapple to meet the demand of those who don’t have an adequate grasp of English, particularly recent migrants and refugees.

Research shows in these situations, children often end up interpreting – known as language brokering – for their parents. This is a heavy responsibility with psychological consequences. Join The Conversation to find out more.

Skilled occupation lists for 2016 / 2017

The Department of Immigration and Border Protection has released the new skilled occupation list for 2016 / 2017. For more information about the occupations lists, please visit the Migration Alliance news page.

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